Scam, kidnap by South African police

Scam, kidnap by South African police

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Scam, kidnap by South African police

Scam, kidnap by South African police

 
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emote

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for February 19, 2019 is:

emote • \ih-MOHT\  • verb

: to give expression to emotion especially in acting

Examples:

"It's not always immediately obvious, but sometimes you fall in love with a band for the way the singers emote." — James Reed, The Boston Globe, 24 Jan. 2012

"Aiming for a higher quality than masks allowed, the makeup artist John Chambers developed a new type of foam rubber and created facial appliances that allowed actors to talk and emote." — Andrew R. Chow, The New York Times, 31 Dec. 2018

Did you know?

Emote is an example of what linguists call a back-formation—that is, a word formed by trimming down an existing word (in this case, emotion). As is sometimes the case with back-formations, emote has since its coinage in the early 20th century tended toward use that is less than entirely serious. It frequently appears in humorous or deprecating descriptions of the work of actors, and is similarly used to describe theatrical behavior by nonactors. Though a writer sometimes wants us to take someone's "emoting" seriously, a phrase like "expressing emotion" avoids the chance that we will hear some snideness in the writer's words.





Tue, 19 Feb 2019 00:00:01 -0500


prestigious

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for February 18, 2019 is:

prestigious • \preh-STIH-juss\  • adjective

1 archaic : of, relating to, or marked by illusion, conjuring, or trickery

2 : having an illustrious name or reputation : esteemed in general opinion

Examples:

Carla was overjoyed to receive an acceptance letter from the prestigious university.

"The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art has announced 16 finalists for its closely watched SECA [Society for the Encouragement of Contemporary Art] Art Award for 2019. The awards are the region's most prestigious recognition for emerging artists." — Charles Desmarais, The San Francisco Chronicle, 14 Dec. 2018

Did you know?

You may be surprised to learn that prestigious had more to do with trickery than with respect when it was first used in the mid-16th century. The earliest (now archaic) meaning of the word was "of, relating to, or marked by illusion, conjuring, or trickery." Prestigious comes to us from the Latin word praestigiosis, meaning "full of tricks" or "deceitful." The words prestige and prestigious are related, of course, though not as directly as you might think; they share a Latin ancestor, but they entered English by different routes. Prestige, which was borrowed from French in the mid-17th century, initially meant "a conjurer's trick," but in the 19th century it developed an extended sense of "blinding or dazzling influence." That change, in turn, influenced prestigious, which now means simply "illustrious or esteemed."





Mon, 18 Feb 2019 00:00:01 -0500


disavow

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for February 17, 2019 is:

disavow • \dis-uh-VOW\  • verb

1 : to deny responsibility for : repudiate

2 : to refuse to acknowledge or accept : disclaim

Examples:

It seems the college's president is now trying to disavow her previous statements.

"Last week in Beijing, ['Crazy Rich Asians'] director Jon M. Chu essentially disavowed every word in the film's title. 'The film is a satire,' Chu told the state-affiliated Global Times. 'It's not about "crazy rich" or "Asians" actually—it's about the opposite of that. It's about how all those things mean nothing and it comes down to our own relationships and finding love and our own families.'" — Rebecca Davis, Variety, 29 Nov. 2018

Did you know?

If you trace the etymology of disavow back through Middle English to Anglo-French, you'll arrive eventually at the prefix des- and the verb avouer, meaning "to avow." The prefix des-, in turn, derives from the Latin prefix dis-, meaning "apart." That Latin prefix plays a significant role in many current English words, including disadvantage, disappoint, and disagree. Avouer is from Latin advocare, meaning "to summon," and is also the source of our word advocate.





Sun, 17 Feb 2019 00:00:01 -0500


gibbous

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for February 16, 2019 is:

gibbous • \JIB-us\  • adjective

1 a : marked by convexity or swelling

b of the moon or a planet : seen with more than half but not all of the apparent disk illuminated

2 : having a hump : humpbacked

Examples:

The fresh layer of snow glistened under the light of the waxing gibbous moon.

"During the fourth lunar orbit, Anders was engaged in photographing the lunar surface when he noticed a slightly gibbous Earth rising above the surface as the spacecraft passed over from the moon's far side to its near side." — Alan Hale, The Alamogordo (New Mexico) Daily News, 23 Dec. 2018

Did you know?

The adjective gibbous has its origins in the Latin noun gibbus, meaning "hump," and in the Late Latin adjective gibbosus, meaning "humpbacked," which Middle English adopted in the 14th century as gibbous. Gibbous has been used to describe the rounded body parts of humans and animals (such as the back of a camel) or to describe the shape of certain flowers (such as snapdragons). The term is most often identified, however, with the study of astronomy. A gibbous moon is one that is more than a half-moon but less than full.





Sat, 16 Feb 2019 00:00:01 -0500


apotheosis

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for February 15, 2019 is:

apotheosis • \uh-pah-thee-OH-sis\  • noun

1 a : the perfect form or example of something : quintessence

b : the highest or best part of something : peak

2 : elevation to divine status : deification

Examples:

"Four decades after its box office debut, Grease remains a cultural phenomenon.… [Olivia] Newton-John is particularly stellar, with her charming persona and spotless soprano voice making the film the apotheosis of her '70s superstardom." — Billboard.com, 4 Oct. 2018

"In 2018, this adaptation [of Ray Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451] speaks to the apotheosis of social media, to the approach of authoritarianism, and to any other anxieties about the self-surveillance state that you might harbor." — Troy Patterson, The New Yorker, 18 May 2018

Did you know?

Among the ancient Greeks, it was sometimes thought fitting—or simply handy, say if you wanted a god somewhere in your bloodline—to grant someone or other "god" status. So they created the word apotheōsis, from the verb apotheoun, meaning "to deify." (The prefix apo- can mean "off," "from," or "away," and theos is the Greek word for "god.") There's not a lot of Greek-style apotheosizing in the 21st century, but there is hero-worship. Our extended use of apotheosis as "elevation to divine status" is the equivalent of "placement on a very high pedestal." Even more common these days is to use apotheosis in reference to a perfect example or ultimate form. For example, one might describe a movie as "the apotheosis of the sci-fi movie genre."





Fri, 15 Feb 2019 00:00:01 -0500
HIV/AIDS: prevent it, learn about it, treat it:  click here.
MJoTA
United States of America Federal Government FDA (Food and Drug Administration) press releases. FDA works to make safe all medicines which injected, inhaled, rubbed in and swallowed.

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Statement from FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, M.D., and Director of FDA’s Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research Peter Marks, M.D., Ph.D., cautioning consumers against receiving young donor plasma infusions that are promoted as unproven treatment for varying conditions
FDA statement cautioning consumers against receiving young donor plasma infusions that are promoted as unproven treatment for varying conditions

Tue, 19 Feb 2019 10:54:00 -0500


Statement from FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, M.D., on new policy to improve access and foster price competition for drugs that face inadequate generic competition
FDA announces new draft guidance titled, Competitive Generic Therapies, to help provide even greater clarity to industry about the CGT pathway.

Fri, 15 Feb 2019 10:00:00 -0500


FDA authorizes first interoperable insulin pump intended to allow patients to customize treatment through their individual diabetes management devices
FDA authorizes first interoperable insulin pump intended to allow patients to customize treatment through their individual diabetes management devices

Thu, 14 Feb 2019 15:29:00 -0500


FDA issues warning letter to doctor for illegally marketing unapproved device with claims to prevent and treat tightening of scar tissue around breast implants
FDA issues warning letter to doctor for illegally marketing unapproved device with claims to prevent and treat tightening of scar tissue around breast implants

Thu, 14 Feb 2019 12:43:00 -0500


Statement from FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, M.D. and Deputy Commissioner Frank Yiannas on findings from the agency’s investigation of the November 2018 outbreak of <em>E. coli</em> O157:H7 in California-linked romaine lettuce
Statement from FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, M.D. and Deputy Commissioner Frank Yiannas on findings from the agency’s investigation of the November 2018 outbreak of E. coli O157:H7 in California-linked romaine lettuce

Wed, 13 Feb 2019 11:20:00 -0500


Statement from FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, M.D. on new programs to promote the adoption of innovations in drug manufacturing that can improve quality and lower drug costs
FDA announces programs to promote adoption of innovations in drug manufacturing

Wed, 13 Feb 2019 10:43:00 -0500


Statement from FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, M.D., on ongoing efforts to stop the spread of illicit opioids, further secure the U.S. drug supply chain and forcefully confront opioid epidemic
FDA issues first warning letter under Drug Supply Chain Security Act to McKesson Corp. for violations highlighted by a concerning tampering incident.

Tue, 12 Feb 2019 09:51:00 -0500
Health feeds from Associated Press. Be aware: some of these stories are prepared from press releases from the CDC, NIH, FDA. Some are original stories. Any discussion of a clinical trial or drug is a second-hand interpretation.

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MJoTA is an acronym for Medical Journal of Therapeutics Africa, http://www.mjota.org, click here.


The MJoTA website is updated frequently and has a search engine.


The story of how MJoTA started, and its early days, was published by University of the Sciences in Philadelphia periodical in the summer of 2007, just before my first trip to Nigeria to gather stories and images. To download the story, click here.


The Medical Writing Institute was started in Nov 2008, 6 months after I left University of Sciences in Philadelphia to focus on MJoTA and to unsuccessfully arrange financing for Nairobi Womens Hospital in Kenya. Only 3 or 4 students may enroll each year, 2 or 3 is even better click here.

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How to write a resume click here
Writing about diseases
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WHO (World Health Organization) disasters and outbreaks feed

Latest Top (8) News


Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) – Saudi Arabia
From 1 January through 31 January 2019, the International Health Regulations (IHR) National Focal Point of Saudi Arabia reported fourteen additional cases of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infection, including three deaths.

Fri, 15 Feb 2019 00:07:00 GMT


Lassa Fever – Nigeria
From 1 January through 10 February 2019, 327 cases of Lassa fever (324 confirmed cases and three probable cases) with 72 deaths (case fatality ratio = 22%) have been reported across 20 states and the Federal Capital Territory, with the majority of cases being reported from Edo (108) and Ondo (103) States.

Thu, 14 Feb 2019 00:01:00 GMT


Ebola virus disease – Democratic Republic of the Congo
Despite slightly fewer cases reported during the past week (Figure 1), current epidemiological indicators highlight that the Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak is continuing with moderate intensity. Katwa and Butembo remain the major health zones of concern, while simultaneously, small clusters continue to occur in various geographically dispersed regions. During the last 21 days (23 January – 12 February 2019), 97 new cases have been reported from 13 health zones (Figure 2), including: Katwa (59), Butembo (12), Beni (7), Kyondo (4), Oicha (4), Vuhovi (3), Biena (2), Kalunguta (2), Komanda (1), Manguredjipa (1), Mabalako (1), Masereka (1), and Mutwanga (1).1 The recent case reported in the Komanda health zone was a resident of Katwa who was exposed to the virus, and subsequently travelled to both Bunia and Komanda. This case comes one month after the last reported case in Ituri Province; underscoring the high risks of reintroduction to previously affected areas, as well as the potential for spread to new ones.

As of 12 February, 823 EVD cases2 (762 confirmed and 61 probable) have been reported, including 517 deaths (overall case fatality ratio: 63%). Cumulatively, cases have been reported from 118 of 287 health areas across 18 health zones, of which 37 health areas have reported a case in the last 21 days. Thus far, 283 people have been discharged from Ebola Treatment Centers (ETCs) and enrolled in a dedicated monitoring and support programme. One new health worker infection was reported in Katwa. To date, a total of 68 health workers have been infected.

Thu, 14 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT


Yellow fever – Brazil
Brazil is currently in the seasonal period for yellow fever, which occurs from December through May. The expansion of the historical area of yellow fever transmission to areas in the south-east of the country in areas along the Atlantic coast previously considered risk-free led to two waves of transmission (Figure 1). One during the 2016–2017 seasonal period, with 778 human cases, including 262 deaths, and another during the 2017–2018 seasonal period, with 1376 human cases, including 483 deaths.

From December 2018 through January 2019, 361 confirmed human cases, including eight deaths, have been reported in 11 municipalities of two states of Brazil. In the southern part of São Paulo state, seven municipalities:El dorado (16 cases), Jacupiranga (1 case), Iporanga (7 cases), Cananeia (3 cases), Cajati (2), Pariquera-Açu (1), and Sete Barras (1) reported confirmed cases. In the same state, additional cases in Vargem (1) and Serra Negra (1) municipalities were confirmed on the border with Minas Gerais State. Additionally, two cases have been confirmed in the municipalities of Antonina and Adrianópolis, located in the eastern part of Paraná State. These are the first confirmed yellow fever cases reported since 2015 from Paraná, a populous state with an international border. Among these confirmed cases, 89% (32/36) are male, the median age is 43 years, and at least 64% (23/36) are rural workers.

Mon, 11 Feb 2019 00:10:00 GMT


Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) – Oman
From 27 January and 31 January 2019, the International Health Regulations (IHR) National Focal Point of Oman reported five cases of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infection.

Mon, 11 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT


Ebola virus disease – Democratic Republic of the Congo
The Ebola virus disease (EVD) in the Democratic Republic of the Congo continues with relatively high numbers of cases reported in recent weeks (Figure 1), and some encouraging signs. Katwa and Butembo health zones remain the epicentres of the outbreak, reporting 71% of cases in the last three weeks, with smaller clusters continuing to occur concurrently across a geographically dispersed area.

As of 5 February, 789 EVD cases1 (735 confirmed and 54 probable) have been reported, including 488 deaths (overall case fatality ratio: 62%). Thus far, 267 people have been discharged from Ebola Treatment Centres (ETCs) and enrolled in a dedicated monitoring and support programme. Among cases with available information regarding age and sex, 58% (454/788) were female, and 30% (232/786) were aged less than 18 years; including 116 children under five years. Five new health worker infections were reported in Katwa (4) and Kalunguta (1); overall 67 health workers have been affected to date.

Thu, 07 Feb 2019 01:00:00 GMT


Dengue fever – Jamaica
On 3 January 2019, the International Health Regulations (IHR) National Focal Point of Jamaica notified WHO of an increase in dengue cases in Jamaica.

From 1 January though 21 January 2019, 339 suspected and confirmed cases including six deaths were reported (Figure 1). In 2018, a total of 986 suspected and confirmed cases of dengue including 13 deaths have been reported. The number of reported dengue cases in 2018 was 4.5 times higher than that reported in 2017 (215 cases including six deaths). Cases reported to date for 2019 exceed the epidemic threshold (Figure 2).

Mon, 04 Feb 2019 01:00:00 GMT


Ebola virus disease – Democratic Republic of the Congo
The Ministry of Health (MoH), WHO and partners continue to respond to an outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD), despite persistent challenges around security and community mistrust impacting response measures.

Thu, 31 Jan 2019 00:00:00 GMT