Scam, kidnap by South African police

Scam, kidnap by South African police

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Scam, kidnap by South African police

Scam, kidnap by South African police

 
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inexorable

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for April 23, 2019 is:

inexorable • \i-NEK-suh-ruh-bul\  • adjective

: not to be persuaded, moved, or stopped : relentless

Examples:

"The question is, what is Nashville anymore, if not gritty joints that nurtured musicians and songwriters? Yes, change is the inexorable constant, but at such an accelerated pace, we are seeing the fabric of Nashville culture being ripped away and replaced with the glitz not of rhinestones, but of klieg lights and slick outsiders spoiling for a deal." — Jim Myers, The Nashville Ledger, 1 Mar. 2019

"As the cost of public school leadership continues its inexorable rise, so do the taxpayer-funded pensions received by educators when they retire." — David McKay Wilson, lohud.com, 7 Mar. 2019

Did you know?

The Latin antecedent of inexorable is inexorabilis, which is itself a combination of the prefix in-, meaning "not," plus exorabilis, meaning "pliant" or "capable of being moved by entreaty." It's a fitting etymology for inexorable. You can beseech and implore until you're blue in the face, but that won't have any effect on something that's inexorable. Inexorable has been a part of the English language since the 1500s. Originally, it was often applied to people or sometimes to personified things, as in "deaf and inexorable laws." These days, it is usually applied to things, as in "inexorable monotony" or "an inexorable trend." In such cases, it essentially means "unyielding" or "inflexible."





Tue, 23 Apr 2019 01:00:01 -0400


intoxicate

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for April 22, 2019 is:

intoxicate • \in-TAHK-suh-kayt\  • verb

1 : poison

2 a : to excite or stupefy by alcohol or a drug especially to the point where physical and mental control is markedly diminished 

b : to excite or elate to the point of enthusiasm or frenzy

Examples:

"But, even as a child, [George] Benjamin preferred classical music: Stravinsky's 'The Rite of Spring,' Mussorgsky's 'Night on Bald Mountain,' Dukas's 'The Sorcerer's Apprentice,' and Beethoven above all. He was 'intoxicated by music,' he told me, noting, 'If I had an afternoon off, I would spend it looking at scores, practicing the piano, writing music….'" — Rebecca Mead, The New Yorker, 17 Sept. 2018

"I ate the berries myself, my tongue carefully and eagerly pressing each one to my palate. The sweet, aromatic juice of each squashed berry intoxicated me for a second." — Varlam Shalamov, "Berries" in Kolyma Stories, 2018

Did you know?

For those who think that alcohol and drugs qualify as poisons, the history of intoxicate offers some etymological evidence to bolster your argument. Intoxicate traces back to toxicum, the Latin word for "poison"—and the earliest meaning of intoxicate was as an adjective describing something (such as the tip of an arrow or dart) steeped in or smeared with poison. That meaning dates to the 15th century; the related verb, meaning "to poison," occurs in the 16th. Both senses are now obsolete. Today, we talk about such harmless things as flowers and perfume having the power to intoxicate. Toxicum turns up in the etymologies of a number of other English words including toxic ("poisonous"), intoxicant ("something that intoxicates"), and detoxify ("to remove a poison from"), as well as a number of names for various poisons themselves.





Mon, 22 Apr 2019 01:00:01 -0400


resurrection

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for April 21, 2019 is:

resurrection • \rez-uh-REK-shun\  • noun

1 a (capitalized Resurrection) : the rising of Christ from the dead

b (often capitalized Resurrection) : the rising again to life of all the human dead before the final judgment

c : the state of one risen from the dead

2 : resurgence, revival

Examples:

"After the ceremony was concluded upon the present occasion, I felt all the easier…. [All] the days I should now live would be as good as the days that Lazarus lived after his resurrection; a supplementary clean gain of so many months or weeks as the case might be." — Herman Melville, Moby-Dick, 1851

"Every few weeks I get a press release declaring that coal is going to make a comeback, but reports of the resurrection have been greatly exaggerated." — Chris Tomlinson, The Houston Chronicle, 11 Mar. 2019

Did you know?

In the 1300s, speakers of Middle English borrowed resurreccioun from Anglo-French. Originally, the word was used in specific Christian contexts to refer to the rising of Christ from the dead or to the festival celebrating this rising (now known as Easter). By the 1400s, the word was being used in the more general sense of "resurgence" or "revival." The Anglo-French resurreccioun comes from the Late Latin resurrectio ("the act of rising from the dead"), which is derived from the verb resurgere ("to rise from the dead"). In earlier Latin, resurgere meant simply "to rise again" and was formed by attaching the re- prefix to the verb surgere, meaning "to rise." Resurgere is also the source of English resurge and resurgence.





Sun, 21 Apr 2019 01:00:01 -0400


propitious

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for April 20, 2019 is:

propitious • \pruh-PISH-us\  • adjective

1 : favorably disposed : benevolent

2 : being a good omen : auspicious

3 : tending to favor : advantageous

Examples:

With the economy emerging from a recession, it was a propitious time to invest in a start-up.

"My instincts tell me that this is a propitious moment in time, a time when people support and insist upon decisive action, a time when policymakers have the courage and commitment to move forward with ideas that may seem bold but are, in essence, sensible and straightforward." — James Aloisi, Commonwealth Magazine, 7 Mar. 2019

Did you know?

Propitious, which comes to us through Middle English from the Latin word propitius, is a synonym of favorable and auspicious. All three essentially mean "pointing toward a happy outcome," with some differences of emphasis. Favorable implies that someone or something involved in a situation is approving or helpful ("a favorable recommendation"), or that circumstances are advantageous ("favorable weather conditions"). Auspicious usually applies to a sign or omen that promises success before or at the start of an event ("an auspicious beginning"). Propitious may also apply to beginnings, but it often suggests a continuing promising condition ("propitious conditions for an alliance").





Sat, 20 Apr 2019 01:00:01 -0400


ecstatic

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for April 19, 2019 is:

ecstatic • \ek-STAT-ik\  • adjective

: of, relating to, or marked by ecstasy

Examples:

Greta and Paul were ecstatic when their daughter called to tell them that they were soon going to be grandparents.

"Harold Pinter established himself as Britain's foremost dramatist by placing inscrutable characters in cryptic situations and he was bound to keep the production line in motion, knowing that his oblique scripts would be greeted by genuflecting reviewers, ecstatic professors of literature and shrewd thesps ululating with approval at every rehearsal." — Lloyd Evans, The Spectator, 24 Nov. 2018

Did you know?

Ecstatic has been used in our language since the late 16th century, and the noun ecstasy is even older, dating from the 1300s. Both derive from the Greek verb existanai ("to put out of place"), which was used in a Greek phrase meaning "to drive someone out of his or her mind." That seems an appropriate history for words that can describe someone who is nearly out of their mind with intense emotion. In early use, ecstatic was sometimes linked to mystic trances, out-of-body experiences, and temporary madness. Today, however, it typically implies a state of enthusiastic excitement or intense happiness.





Fri, 19 Apr 2019 01:00:01 -0400
HIV/AIDS: prevent it, learn about it, treat it:  click here.
MJoTA
United States of America Federal Government FDA (Food and Drug Administration) press releases. FDA works to make safe all medicines which injected, inhaled, rubbed in and swallowed.

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Statement from Jeffrey Shuren, M.D., J.D., Director of the FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health, on new steps to help reduce risks associated with surgical staplers for internal use and implantable staples
Statement from Jeffrey Shuren, M.D., J.D., Director of the FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health, on new steps to help reduce risks associated with surgical staplers for internal use and implantable staples

Tue, 23 Apr 2019 10:41:00 -0400


Statement from FDA Associate Commissioner for Regulatory Affairs Melinda K. Plaisier, on agency’s new steps to strengthen the process of initiating voluntary recalls
New steps to strengthen the process of initiating voluntary recalls

Tue, 23 Apr 2019 10:01:00 -0400


Statement from Peter Marks, M.D., Ph.D., director of FDA’s Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, on FDA’s continued confidence in the safety and effectiveness of the measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine
The FDA wants to underscore our continued confidence in the safety and effectiveness of the vaccines that are highly successful at preventing – in some cases, nearly eradicating – preventable diseases. Large well-designed studies have confirmed the safety and effectiveness of the MMR vaccine and have demonstrated that administration of the vaccine is not associated with the development of autism. MMR vaccine has been approved in the United States for nearly 50 years to prevent measles, mumps and rubella (also known as German Measles). As a result of its use, measles and rubella were completely eradicated in the United States, and mumps cases decreased by 99%.

Mon, 22 Apr 2019 12:29:00 -0400


FDA permits marketing of first medical device for treatment of ADHD
FDA permits marketing of first medical device for treatment of ADHD

Fri, 19 Apr 2019 18:08:00 -0400


FDA approves first generic naloxone nasal spray to treat opioid overdose
FDA granted approval of the 1st generic naloxone hydrochloride nasal spray, commonly known as Narcan, a life-saving medication that can stop or reverse the effects of an opioid overdose

Fri, 19 Apr 2019 11:20:00 -0400


FDA Statement from Deputy Commissioner for Food Policy and Response Frank Yiannas on new steps to protect consumers from unlawful ingredients in dietary supplements
FDA Statement from Deputy Commissioner for Food Policy and Response Frank Yiannas on new steps to protect consumers from unlawful ingredients in dietary supplements

Tue, 16 Apr 2019 12:42:00 -0400


FDA takes action to protect women’s health, orders manufacturers of surgical mesh intended for transvaginal repair of pelvic organ prolapse to stop selling all devices
FDA informs companies that the agency is not approving their PMA applications and that they will have to remove their products from the market

Tue, 16 Apr 2019 11:49:00 -0400
Health feeds from Associated Press. Be aware: some of these stories are prepared from press releases from the CDC, NIH, FDA. Some are original stories. Any discussion of a clinical trial or drug is a second-hand interpretation.

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MJoTA is an acronym for Medical Journal of Therapeutics Africa, http://www.mjota.org, click here.


The MJoTA website is updated frequently and has a search engine.


The story of how MJoTA started, and its early days, was published by University of the Sciences in Philadelphia periodical in the summer of 2007, just before my first trip to Nigeria to gather stories and images. To download the story, click here.


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WHO (World Health Organization) disasters and outbreaks feed

Latest Top (8) News


Ebola virus disease – Democratic Republic of the Congo
The incidence of Ebola virus disease (EVD) cases in the Democratic Republic of the Congo continued to increase this week; however, it remained confined to a limited geographical area within North Kivu and Ituri provinces. This recent trend is likely attributable, in part, to past and ongoing security issues, unrest amongst certain local populations, and lingering community mistrust towards outbreak response teams. Improved case detection and response activities have been observed in previously inaccessible hotspots.

In the 21 days between 27 March and 16 April 2019, 55 health areas within 11 health zones reported new cases; 39% of the 143 health areas affected to date (Table 1 and Figure 2). During this period, a total of 249 confirmed cases were reported from Katwa (124), Vuhovi (40), Mandima (28), Butembo (24), Beni (16), Oicha (6), Mabalako (5), Kalunguta (2), Masereka (2), Musienene (1), and Lubero (1).

Thu, 18 Apr 2019 00:00:00 GMT


Yellow fever – Brazil
In Brazil, seasonal increases of yellow fever have historically occurred between December and May.

Thu, 18 Apr 2019 00:00:00 GMT


Ebola virus disease – Democratic Republic of the Congo
The rise in number of Ebola virus disease (EVD) cases observed in the North Kivu provinces of the Democratic Republic of the Congo continues this week. During the last 21 days (20 March to 9 April 2019), 57 health areas within 11 health zones reported new cases; 40% of the 141 health areas affected to date (Table 1 and Figure 2). During this period, a total of 207 probable and confirmed cases were reported from Katwa (83), Vuhovi (41), Mandima (29), Beni (21), Butembo (15), Oicha (8), Masereka (4), Lubero (2), Musienene (2), Kalunguta (1), and Mabalako (1).

As of 9 April, a total of 1186 confirmed and probable EVD cases have been reported, of which 751 died (case fatality ratio 63%). Of the 1186 cases with reported age and sex, 57% (675) were female, and 29% (341) were children aged less than 18 years. The number of healthcare workers affected has risen to 87 (7% of total cases), including 31 deaths. To date, a total of 354 EVD patients who received care at Ebola Treatment Centres (ETCs) have been discharged.

Thu, 11 Apr 2019 00:00:00 GMT


Ebola virus disease – Democratic Republic of the Congo
This past week saw a marked increase in the number of Ebola virus disease (EVD) cases in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. During the last 21 days (13 March to 2 April 2019), 57 health areas within 12 health zones reported new cases; 42% of the 135 health areas affected to date (Table 1 and Figure 2). During this period, a total of 172 confirmed cases were reported from Katwa (50), Vuhovi (34), Mandima (28), Masereka (18), Beni (13), Butembo (12), Oicha (8), Kayna (3), Lubero (3), Kalunguta (1), Bunia (1) and Musienene (1). WHO and partners will continue to adapt our strategies and strengthen response efforts to limit the further spread of EVD in these health areas.

As of 2 April, a total of 1100 confirmed and probable EVD cases have been reported, of which 690 died (case fatality ratio 63%). Of the 1100 cases with reported age and sex, 58% (633) were female, and 29% (320) were children aged less than 18 years. The number of healthcare workers affected has risen to 81 (7% of total cases), including 27 deaths.

Thu, 04 Apr 2019 00:00:00 GMT


Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) – The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
From 1 through 28 February 2019, the National IHR Focal Point of Saudi Arabia reported 68 additional cases of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infection, including 10 deaths. Of the 68 MERS cases reported in February, 19 cases occurred in cities other than Wadi Aldwasir.

This Disease Outbreak News update describes the 19 cases. Among these cases, fifteen were sporadic, and four were reported as part of two unrelated clusters. Cluster 1 involved two cases in Buridah city; and Cluster 2 involved two cases in Riyadh city. The link below provides details of the 19 reported cases.

Fri, 29 Mar 2019 00:00:00 GMT


Ebola virus disease – Democratic Republic of the Congo
The ongoing Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak in the North Kivu and Ituri provinces saw a rise in the number of new cases this past week. At this time, response teams are facing daily challenges in ensuring timely and thorough identification and investigation of all cases amidst a backdrop of sporadic violence from armed groups and pockets of mistrust in some affected communities. Despite this, progress is being made in areas such as Mandima, Masereka and Vuhovi, where response teams are gradually able to access once again and acceptance by the community of proven interventions to break the chains of transmission is observed.

During the last 21 days (6 – 26 March), a total of 125 new cases were reported from 51 health areas within 12 of the 21 health zones affected to date; 38% of the 133 health areas affected to date (Figure 2). The majority of these cases were from remaining hotspot areas of Katwa (36), Butembo (14), and three emerging clusters in Mandima (19), Masereka (18) and Vuhovi (17), in addition to a limited number of cases in other areas (Table 1). All cases link back to chains of transmission in hotspot areas, with onward local transmission observed in a limited number of towns and villages within family/social networks or health centers where cases have visited prior to their detection and isolation.

Thu, 28 Mar 2019 00:00:00 GMT


Ebola virus disease – Democratic Republic of the Congo
The Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak in North Kivu and Ituri provinces has recently shown an increase in the number of cases reported by week, after many weeks of overall decline (Figure 1). This rise is not unexpected and, in part, likely a result of the increased security challenges, including the recent direct attacks on treatment centers, and pockets of community mistrust, which slowed some response activities in affected areas for a few days.

Katwa, Butembo, Masereka and Mandima account for over 80% of all cases in the last 21 days. A total of 97 confirmed cases were reported during the last 21 days from 38 of the 130 health areas affected to date (Table 1, Figure 2). This week, EVD was confirmed in an infant who died in Bunia Health Zone, but whose parents are in good health. This is the first confirmed case from this health zone; a previous case was identified from neighbouring Rwampara Health Zone in early February. While investigations are ongoing to determine the source of the infection, teams in place have rapidly implemented response activities including contact tracing, vaccination and heightened surveillance. Given the geographical spread of the epidemic and the high mobility in this region, the risk of Ebola spreading to unaffected areas or being reintroduced to previously affected areas remains high.

Thu, 21 Mar 2019 00:00:00 GMT


Ebola virus disease – Democratic Republic of the Congo
The public health response to the Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak continues to make gains. During the last 21 days (20 February – 12 March 2019), no new cases have been detected in 10 of the 20 health zones that have been affected during the outbreak (Figure 1). There has also been fewer new cases observed over the past five weeks compared to January 2019 and earlier in the outbreak (Figure 2).

Currently, the greatest concern centres on the neighbouring urban areas of Katwa and Butembo, which continue to contribute about three-quarters of recent cases. Clusters in other areas of North Kivu and Ituri provinces have been linked to chains of transmission in Katwa and Butembo, and have thus far been contained to limited local transmissions with relatively small numbers of cases. A total of 74 confirmed cases were reported during the last 21 days from 32 of the 125 health areas affected to date (Table 1). Risk of further chains of transmission and spread remain high, as highlighted by the recent spread to Lubero Health Zone, and reintroduction to Biena Health Zone following a prolonged period without new cases.

Thu, 14 Mar 2019 00:00:00 GMT