Scam, kidnap by South African police

Scam, kidnap by South African police

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Scam, kidnap by South African police

Scam, kidnap by South African police

 
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contraption

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for June 24, 2019 is:

contraption • \kun-TRAP-shun\  • noun

: device, gadget

Examples:

"In Connecticut, the Hartford Marathon Foundation worked with an engineering company to create a 40-foot-long drinking fountain for the finish line of its race. The contraption, known as the Bubbler, allows multiple people to drink at the same time and is estimated to have saved about 85,000 plastic bottles and wax cups since 2007, according to the foundation." — Sarah Mervosh, The New York Times, 10 Apr. 2019

"And scientists are creating devices to track the decay of icebergs. The small, cylindrical contraptions will be deployed in the Arctic, where they will sit atop ice as it breaks off and floats away from larger ice formations." — Laura Krantz, The Boston Globe, 9 May 2019

Did you know?

English has a number of words that can be used as general terms for mechanical or electronic devices, including gadget, gizmo, widget, and contraption. In addition to their meaning, these four words also have a couple of other things in common. First, they are all relative newcomers to the language. The oldest, contraption, entered the language in the early 1800s. Second, the origins of all four are a bit of a mystery. While widget is believed to be an alteration of gadget, the origins of gadget are unknown—it didn't appear in print until later in the 19th century, and it is believed to have been used earlier among sailors. Gizmo sprang into American English in the mid-20th century from origins unknown. The word contraption may be a blend of contrivance (which can be used as another synonym of gadget), trap, and invention.





Mon, 24 Jun 2019 01:00:01 -0400


lade

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for June 23, 2019 is:

lade • \LAYD\  • verb

1 a : to put a load or burden on or in : load

b : to put or place as a load especially for shipment : ship

c : to load heavily or oppressively

2 : dip, ladle

Examples:

"… we might, for example, see what are arguably Mr. Boontje's two most influential designs: his Blossom chandelier for Swarovski, a sparkling spray of branches laden with rosy crystals; and the more affordable Garland light…." — Pilar Viladas, The New York Times, 9 May 2019

"There were no pictures on the walls but here and there boughs laden with heavy-petalled flowers spread widely against them." — Virginia Woolf, The Voyage Out, 1915

Did you know?

Lade most often occurs in its past participle form laden, as shown in our examples. There is also the adjective laden, best distinguished from the verb by its placement before nouns, as in "laden ships" or "a laden heart." (The adjective is also at work in hyphenated terms like sugar-laden.) Lade has been in use for more than a millennium and formerly had a nominal counterpart: the noun lade, meaning "load" or "cargo," came to be around the same time but is now obsolete. A few short decades after it faded from active use, the noun lading took on the same meaning. Lading is still in use and appears most often in bill of lading—a term referring to a document that lists goods being shipped and specifies the terms of their transport.





Sun, 23 Jun 2019 01:00:01 -0400


puckish

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for June 22, 2019 is:

puckish • \PUCK-ish\  • adjective

: impish, whimsical

Examples:

"Ms. Jamon, with her charm and puckish humor, makes the restaurant feel like a home. For Christmas in 2009, after their move from Los Angeles, there was a fully decorated tree hanging upside down from the ceiling. 'Everything in the world seems upside down,' she said, 'so I decided to match it.'" — John Willoughby, The New York Times, 14 Mar. 2019

"[Thomas] Venning said the wheelchair became a symbol … of [Stephen] Hawking's 'puckish sense of humor.' He once ran over Prince Charles' toes—and reportedly joked that he wished he had done the same to Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher—and appeared in a 'Monty Python' skit running down fellow physicist Brian Cox." — The Salt Lake Tribune, 22 Oct. 2018

Did you know?

We know Puck as "that merry wanderer of the night," the shape-changing, maiden-frightening, mischief-sowing henchman to the king of the fairies in William Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream. The Bard drew on English folklore in casting his character, but the traditional Puck was more malicious than the Shakespearean imp; he was an evil spirit or demon. In medieval England, this nasty hobgoblin was known as the puke or pouke, names related to the Old Norse pūki, meaning "devil." (There is no connection to modern English puke.) But it was the Bard's characterization that stuck, and by the time the adjective puckish started appearing regularly in English texts in the 1800s the association was one of impishness, not evil.





Sat, 22 Jun 2019 01:00:01 -0400


tonsorial

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for June 21, 2019 is:

tonsorial • \tahn-SOR-ee-ul\  • adjective

: of or relating to a barber or the work of a barber

Examples:

"Once again Ryan's Barber Shop and Shaving Parlor … provided the tonsorial team the chairs and the needed supplies for the men to sit down and get their faces cleaned up or hair trimmed." — Steve Moran, The Asbury Park (New Jersey) Press, 6 Dec. 2018

"I think we are still a long way off from having tonsorial robots, so whatever the trends and styles that come about ... as long as we are all still growing hair out of our heads, there will be patrons attending the barbershop." — Adam Castleforte, quoted in The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, 24 Sept. 2018

Did you know?

Tonsorial is a fancy word that describes the work of those who give shaves and haircuts. (It can apply more broadly to hairdressers as well.) It derives from the Latin verb tondēre, meaning "to shear, clip, or crop." (Another descendant, tonsor, is an archaic word for a barber.) You might be more familiar with the related noun tonsure, which refers to the shaven crown or patch worn by monks and other clerics, or the religious rite of clipping the hair of one being admitted as a cleric. The verb tonsure means "to shave the head of" or "to confer the tonsure upon."





Fri, 21 Jun 2019 01:00:01 -0400


demeanor

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for June 20, 2019 is:

demeanor • \dih-MEE-ner\  • noun

: behavior toward others : outward manner

Examples:

The professor's friendly and laid-back demeanor made him a favorite among the students.

"Detroit's well-earned place as one of America's most iconic cities is a credit to its past, present and future. It is a city that has never had it easy, but its steely demeanor has also always encased and protected a powerful heart." — Adweek.com, 14 May 2019

Did you know?

There's a long trail from the Latin origins of demeanor to its English incarnation. It starts with minari, "to threaten"—a word connected to the threatening cries of cattle drivers. Leaving minari, we soon encounter a close Latin relation, minare; it means "to drive," and was once used specifically of driving animals for herding. From there, the path leads us to Anglo-French, where we pass by mener ("to lead") and then demener ("to conduct"). Next comes Middle English demenen and then Modern English demean, both meaning "to conduct (oneself) in a certain manner." And, finally, we take one last step, and add the suffix -or to demean to get demeanor.





Thu, 20 Jun 2019 01:00:01 -0400
HIV/AIDS: prevent it, learn about it, treat it:  click here.
MJoTA
United States of America Federal Government FDA (Food and Drug Administration) press releases. FDA works to make safe all medicines which injected, inhaled, rubbed in and swallowed.

Latest Top (7) News


FDA Statement on the FDA’s ongoing investigation into valsartan and ARB class impurities and the agency’s steps to address the root causes of the safety issues
FDA describes the ongoing investigation into the ARB class impurities and agency’s steps to address the root causes of the safety issues




FDA approves first anticoagulant (blood thinner) for pediatric patients to treat potentially life-threatening blood clots
The FDA approved Fragmin (dalteparin sodium) injection, for subcutaneous use, to reduce the recurrence of symptomatic venous thromboembolism (VTE) in pediatric patients one month of age and older.




FDA approves first chemoimmunotherapy regimen for patients with relapsed or refractory diffuse large B-cell lymphoma
FDA approved Polivy in combination with the chemotherapy bendamustine and a rituximab product to treat adult patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma that has progressed or returned after at least two prior therapies.




FDA approves new treatment for hypoactive sexual desire disorder in premenopausal women
FDA approved Vyleesi (bremelanotide) to treat acquired, generalized hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) in premenopausal women.




FDA approves new treatment for pediatric patients with type 2 diabetes
: FDA approves Victoza (liraglutide) injection for pediatric patients with type 2 diabetes. Victoza creates the same effect as GLP-1 receptor protein and is the first non-insulin drug approved since metformin in 2000.




FDA authorizes first interoperable insulin pump intended to allow patients to customize treatment through their individual diabetes management devices
FDA authorizes first interoperable insulin pump intended to allow patients to customize treatment through their individual diabetes management devices




FDA expands approval of treatment for cystic fibrosis to include patients ages 6 and older
FDA expanded the indication for Symdeko for treatment of pediatric patients ages 6 years and older with cystic fibrosis who have certain genetic mutations.


Health feeds from Associated Press. Be aware: some of these stories are prepared from press releases from the CDC, NIH, FDA. Some are original stories. Any discussion of a clinical trial or drug is a second-hand interpretation.

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WHO (World Health Organization) disasters and outbreaks feed

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Ebola virus disease – Democratic Republic of the Congo
This week saw a continued, gradual decrease in the number of new Ebola virus disease (EVD) cases from the hotspots of Katwa and Butembo compared to the previous weeks. However, these encouraging signs are offset by a marked increase in case incidence in Mabalako Health Zone, and especially in Aloya Health Area (Figure 1). While the spread of EVD to new geographic areas remains low, in the health zones of Bunia, Lubero, Komanda and Rwampara, recent reintroduction events illustrate the high risks in previously affected areas. Along with the rise in cases in Mabalako, there was also an accompanying increase in healthcare worker (HCW) and nosocomial infections. These findings highlight the ongoing need to comprehensively strengthen the infection prevention and control measures in the various healthcare facilities operating in these areas. The occurrence of EVD infections in these health areas also place a strain on the already limited security resources needed to facilitate access for effective response activities to continue.

In addition to operational challenges encountered on the ground by healthcare workers during the past ten months, the overall EVD outbreak response effort is confronting substantial difficulty in maintaining scale in the context of a US $54 million funding shortage. Without adequate funding to fill this gap, response activities will be compromised, negatively impacting the entire response, resulting in a drastic reduction in vital health services available and a cessation of operations during a critical time of the outbreak. Member States and other donors are strongly encouraged to help meet this funding gap in order to ensure that hard won progress in containing this EVD outbreak will not suffer a potentially devastating setback due to financial limitations.

Thu, 20 Jun 2019 00:00:00 GMT


Ebola virus disease – Democratic Republic of the Congo
The Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) continues to show a decrease in the number of new cases in hotspots such as Katwa, Beni and Kalunguta health zones. However, in other areas such as Mabalako and Butembo, moderate rates of transmission continue. With ongoing EVD transmission within communities in 12 health zones in North Kivu and Ituri provinces, factors such as persistent delays in case detection, approximately a third of cases dying outside of Ebola treatment or transit centres, and high population mobility, pose a high risk of geographical spread both within the DRC and to neighbouring countries. This was highlighted by the recent exportation of cases to Uganda – the first confirmed cases detected outside of North Kivu and Ituri province since the onset of the outbreak over 10 months ago. For more information, please see Disease Outbreak News on EVD in Uganda

Weekly decrease in the incidence of new cases have been reported in several health zones; however, increase or a continuation of the outbreak has been observed in others (Figure 1). In the 21 days, between 22 May to 11 June 2019, 62 health areas within 12 health zones reported new cases, representing 9% of the 664 health areas within North Kivu and Ituri provinces (Figure 2). During this period, a total of 212 confirmed cases were reported, the majority of which were from the health zones of Mabalako (33%, n=69), Butembo (18%, n=39), Katwa (14%, n=30) Mandima (11%, n=23) and Beni (9%, n=20). Single confirmed cases were also reported from Rwampara and Komanda health zones this past week following a prolonged period since the last reported case, with both cases acquiring the infection in the aforementioned hotspots.

Thu, 13 Jun 2019 00:00:00 GMT


Ebola virus disease – Republic of Uganda
On 11 June 2019, the Ugandan Ministry of Health (MoH) has confirmed a case of Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) in Kasese district, Uganda. The patient is a 5-year-old child from the Democratic Republic of the Congo who travelled with his family from Mabalako Health Zone in Democratic Republic of the Congo after attending, on 1 June 2019, the funeral of his grandfather (confirmed EVD case on 2 June 2019). On 10 June 2019, the child and the family entered the country through Bwera border post and sought medical care at Kagando hospital where health workers identified Ebola as a possible cause of illness. The child was transferred to Bwera Ebola Treatment Unit (ETU) for management. The confirmation of Ebola Virus was made on 11 June 2019 at the Uganda Virus Research Institute (UVRI), and the child has deceased in the early hours of 12 June 2019. Two other suspected cases, a 50-year-old female (grandmother of the first case) and 3-year-old male (younger brother of the first case) part of the family members who travelled together with the first confirmed child were also admitted in the same ETU and were confirmed for EVD by UVRI on 12 June 2019. The 50 year-old-female died during the night between 12 and 13 June. 27 other contacts have been identified and are being monitored. Healthcare workers from both health care facilities where the child was treated have been previously vaccinated.

All three confirmed cases are imported from Democratic Republic of the Congo and belong to the same family who travelled together from Mabalako Health Zone, an area currently affected by Ebola outbreak in North Kivu, Democratic Republic of the Congo. To date, they remain as a single episode of EVD in Uganda, and the geographical spread in Uganda appears to be limited to one district near Democratic Republic of the Congo border. Further investigations are ongoing both in Uganda and Democratic Republic of the Congo to assess the full extent of the outbreak.

Thu, 13 Jun 2019 00:00:00 GMT


Circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus type 2 – Cameroon
On 23 May 2019, WHO received notification through the Global Polio Laboratory Network (GPLN) of the detection of circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus type 2 (cVDPV2) from an environmental sample collected on 20 April 2019 in a hospital in Northern Cameroon which borders Borno state in Nigeria and Chad.

Thu, 06 Jun 2019 00:00:00 GMT


Ebola virus disease – Democratic Republic of the Congo
As the Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak surpasses the 2000 case mark, indicators over the past two weeks provide early signs of an easing of the transmission intensity. This follows a period of improved security and therefore access to communities, allowing response teams to operate more freely. A total of 88 confirmed cases were reported each week for the past two epidemiological weeks, down from a peak of 126 cases per week observed in April. Declines in the incidence of new cases have been most apparent in hotspots such as Katwa, Mandima and Beni health zones. Concurrently, improvements in the proportion of cases among contacts registered prior to onset (up from 30% three weeks ago to 55% last week), and a lower proportion of cases resulting from transmission within community health facilities (from 31% during the first week of April 2019 to 9% during the last week of May 2019), are encouraging. Nevertheless, both indicators are below where we would aim to be. The outbreak continues to be contained within 12 active health zones in North Kivu and Ituri provinces.

However, substantive rates of transmission continue within affected communities, and further waves of the outbreak may be expected. An increase in the incidence of new cases has been reported from Mabalako Health Zone in recent weeks, and high infection rates continue within Butembo metropolitan. Times between detecting, reporting and admission of cases at Ebola treatment/transit centres (ETCs) remains too long (median 6 days, interquartile range 4–9 days in the past 3 weeks), with about a third (34% in the past 3 weeks) of cases dying outside of ETCs. Collectively these indicators highlight that the risks associated with this outbreak remain very high.

Thu, 06 Jun 2019 00:00:00 GMT


Ebola virus disease – Democratic Republic of the Congo
A decline in the number of confirmed Ebola virus disease (EVD) cases has been reported this week (22 to 28 May). Over the past seven days, a total of 73 new confirmed cases were reported compared to the previous where 127 new confirmed cases were reported. This should be interpreted with caution given the complex operating environment and fragility of the security situation. Katwa, one of the epicenters of the outbreak, reported fewer cases this week and other health zones such as Mabalako, Kalunguta and Mandima have also seen a decline in case reporting. Active transmission was reported in 14 of the 22 health zones that have been affected to date. Other initial encouraging findings such as a lower proportion of reported nosocomial infections, a lower proportion of community deaths and a higher proportion of registered contacts at case detection have also been reported. Weekly fluctuations in these indicators have been reported in the past and uncertainties remain with regards to the ability of the surveillance system to identify all new cases in areas faced with ongoing insecurity. Operations are still regularly hampered by security issues, and the risk of national and regional spread remains very high.

Mabalako reported 24% (73/309) of the new confirmed cases in the past 21 days. Nine out of the 12 Mabalako health areas have reported new confirmed cases during this period. In the 21 days between 8 to 28 May 2019, 83 health areas within 14 health zones reported new cases, representing 46% of the 180 health areas affected to date (Table 1 and Figure 2). During this period, a total of 309 confirmed cases were reported, the majority of which were from the Mabalako (24%, n=73), Butembo (21%, n=64), Katwa (14%, n=42), Beni (11%, n=34), Kalunguta (10%, n=31), Musienene (7%, n=23) and Mandima (6%, n=20) health zones.

Thu, 30 May 2019 00:00:00 GMT


Wild poliovirus type 1 – Islamic Republic of Iran
On 9 May 2019, the Global Polio Laboratory Network (GPLN) notified WHO of the detection of wild poliovirus type 1 (WPV1) from an environmental sewage sample collected on 20 April 2019 in Konarak district, Sistan-Baluchistan province, Islamic Republic of Iran. The virus was detected in an environmental sample only, and to date, no associated cases of paralysis have been detected.

The subsequent scheduled sewage sample collected from the same site on 4 May 2019 (2 weeks after the positive sample) tested negative for poliovirus.

Fri, 24 May 2019 00:00:00 GMT


Ebola virus disease – Democratic Republic of the Congo
Although this past week continues to bear witness to a steady rise in the number of Ebola virus disease (EVD) cases in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, the overall security situation has allowed for the resumption of most response activities. While no major insecurity incidents have occurred, outbreak response teams, local healthcare workers, and community members cooperating with response efforts, are increasingly subjected to threats made against them by armed groups present in hotspot areas such as Katwa and Butembo. These threats are often disseminated through leaflets or direct intimidation. Armed groups’ presence, activities and increasing direct threats against response teams continue to be reported in other EVD affected areas, in particular Lubero, Masereka, Mabalako, Kalunguta, and Vuhovi, resulting in some healthcare workers being unwilling to don personal protective equipment or perform critical Infection Prevention Control (IPC) measures out of fear of violence being levied against them or the healthcare facilities where they operate.

During the past three weeks, reports indicate that transmission remains most intense in seven main hotspot areas: Beni, Butembo, Kalunguta, Katwa, Mabalako, Mandima, and Musienene. Collectively, these health zones account for the vast majority (93%) of the 349 cases reported in the last 21 days between 1 - 21 May 2019 (Figure 1 and Table 1). During this period, new cases were reported from 91 health areas within 15 of the 22 health zones affected to date (Figure 2).

Thu, 23 May 2019 00:00:00 GMT